Social Media Toolkit

Below are suggested graphics and accompanying text for your social media from Oct 1 to 15, 2019.

Please feel free to modify as you see appropriate for your audience and for the social media. The dates to post are guidelines leading up to the forum on Oct 15. Notes in square brackets and highlighted in yellow are just that – notes, and not to be included in the text. Graphics are available in square (Instagram) and rectangular versions (Twitter, LinkedIn, Facebook). As well, to suit your preferences, graphics are available without the hashtag or tagline in the graphic as noted.

We would greatly appreciate you using the hashtag #AllWelcomeHere in the text so that we can track this campaign.

Other hashtags you may want to use as well: #RefugeesWelcome #RefugeeClaimants #WithRefugees #AsylumSeekers

Get the shareable graphics by clicking here. Download the Social Media Toolkit by clicking here.

    Graphic Text
    #AllWelcomeHere

 

[Note: Introduction or recap of campaign, to be used as is needed or appropriate]

The All Welcome Here coalition is a group of non-partisan British Columbia organizations working together to support refugees and refugee-friendly public policy. We do this by facilitating effective inter-organizational communication and timely, active responses to issues in the public discourse based on facts, research, lived experience, and storytelling.

#AllWelcomeHere

 

    Same graphic as above The All Welcome Here coalition is a group of non-partisan British Columbia organizations working together to support refugees and refugee-friendly public policy. #AllWelcomeHere

The All Welcome Here coalition facilitates effective inter-organizational communication and timely, active responses to refugee issues in the public discourse based on facts, research, lived experience, and storytelling.
#AllWelcomeHere

    Same graphic as above We support refugees and refugee-friendly public policy. Because it’s not where you’re from, but where you’re going.
#AllWelcomeHere
    Small Business Owners

 

Refugees welcome in BC

[tagline]

[version available without tagline]

Newcomers who came as refugees — and their children — are more likely to start small businesses that support employees and our economy than those born in Canada.
#AllWelcomeHere
    Seeking: Security and Protection

 

 

Refugees are seeking security and protection from threats to their own lives. It is far more difficult to enter Canada as a refugee than as a visitor because the refugee determination process involves security checks by CSIS and the RCMP, fingerprinting, and interviews.
#AllWelcomeHere
    They will change our communities.

 

Refugees welcome in BC

[version available without tagline]

Welcoming refugee newcomers is a long-term investment in our communities. After 20 years of living in Canada, those who arrive as refugees experience the same income distribution on a household level, as well as the same home ownership levels, as other Canadians.
#AllWelcomeHere
   

 

Young, well-educated, speaks English

 

Refugees welcome in BC

[version available without tagline]

 

The ISSofBC Report released in June 2018, shows that refugee claimants participating in the report survey were overwhelmingly young, well-educated, and able to speak English. A total of 72% had pursued education beyond high school, while 61% had university or graduate degrees. A total of 96% self-reported English language proficiency. Of those, over three-quarters self-identified as having intermediate (36%) or advanced (40%) English skills. #AllWelcomeHere
    Young, well-educated, speaks English

 

Refugees welcome in BC

[version available without tagline]

 

(3 Posts)

The @ISSBC Report released in June 2018 shows that refugee claimants participating in the report survey were overwhelmingly young, well-educated, and able to speak English. #AllWelcomeHere

DYK? A total of 72% of refugee claimants pursued education beyond high school, while 61% had university or graduate degrees – @ISSBC Report, 2018. #AllWelcomeHere

A total of 96% of refugee claimants self-reported English language proficiency. Of those, over three-quarters self-identified as having intermediate (36%) or advanced (40%) English skills. – @ISSBC Report, 2018 #AllWelcomeHere

    Same graphic as above Newcomers who arrive as refugees in Canada are contributors to society, just like you and me.
#AllWelcomeHere
    Just like our grandparents.

 

Refugees welcome in BC

[version available without tagline]

Refugees today are no different than our grandparents: puritans fleeing persecution, the Irish fleeing famine, the Jews fleeing genocide.
#AllWelcomeHere
    We are all human.

 

#AllWelcomeHere

[Version Available without hashtag]

No one chooses to be a refugee.
#AllWelcomeHere
    No such thing as queue jumping

 

Refugees welcome in BC

[version available without tagline]

Asylum-seekers or refugee claimants are not placed ahead of immigrants who already have applications in progress. Two separate processes are followed: https://www.canada.ca/en/immigration-refugees-citizenship/campaigns/irregular-border-crossings-asylum/myth.html

[Link to graphic]
#AllWelcomeHere

    It’s a human right, not a gift.

 

#AllWelcomeHere

[Version Available without hashtag]

Refugee claimants have a right to make a claim. That right is protected in Canadian law, which builds on Canada’s international obligations with the 1951 UN Refugee Convention.

[Source: https://laws.justice.gc.ca/eng/acts/i-2.5/fulltext.html ]
#AllWelcomeHere